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New business lessens strain on environment and pocketbook

From food to toys and books to electronics and home décor, Crate is what’s called a bin store, giving thousands of items a second or even third chance rather than ending up in the landfill.
From food to toys and books to electronics and home decor, Crate is what’s called a bin store,...
From food to toys and books to electronics and home decor, Crate is what’s called a bin store, giving thousands of items a second or even third chance rather than ending up in the landfill.(Miranda O'Bryan)
Published: Sep. 24, 2021 at 3:35 PM MDT
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RAPID CITY, S.D. (KEVN) - The average American consumer produces about five pounds of trash per day, most of which can be recycled or reused according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

In Rapid City, the solid waste landfill receives around 60 tons of trash every day. That’s about 120,000 pounds daily.

“Everything that you can think of. Stuff that is brand new, stuff that it doesn’t need to be in the trash, and then, of course, there’s the things that actually should be thrown away,” said Ria Harper, the outreach coordinator for the Rapid City solid waste landfill. “But a lot of it could be diverted.”

One new business in Rapid City is doing just that, diverting overstock or return items so they don’t wind up in the dump.

“We actually order from distributors so kind of like a middle man between Amazon and Target, is mainly where we get the loads from,” said Tareja Mitchem, co-owner of Crate. “And then they come in on semis, we unload them ourselves, with a forklift, and then we go through all of the pallets. So normally we get 26 to 30 pallets per load, so thousands of items and then we just disperse that out throughout the weeks.”

From food to toys and books to electronics and home decor, Crate is what’s called a bin store, giving thousands of items a second or even third chance rather than ending up in the landfill.

“Some of the items that we have leftover from the previous week, we do donate, especially to schools, to the Hope Center so just to kind of get our name out there and to learn about these different programs in the community that we can help out,” continued Mitchem.

Starting at $8 and working down to $1 for almost every single item in the store, Crate helps the environment and the pocketbook.

“It’s different every day, I’ll start by saying that,” said Mitchem. “But the biggest thing people look forward to coming in here is the treasure hunt. You just never know what you’re going to find. We do try to categorize some things like we try to put clothes in a create, put food in a crate, electronics but a lot of other things are all mixed in so you just never know what you’re going to find.”

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